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Although The Dallas County Malware Did Not Encrypt Files, Hackers Say They Were Able To Take Private Information

Despite the concerns raised by the Chinese hacking report, Deputy Pentagon press Secretary Sabrina Singh refrained from offering a direct comment on the specifics of the breach. (Photo: Defense Communities)
Despite the concerns raised by the Chinese hacking report, Deputy Pentagon press Secretary Sabrina Singh refrained from offering a direct comment on the specifics of the breach. (Photo: Defense Communities)

If Dallas County doesn’t pay a ransom by Friday, an international cyber hacking organization threatens to disclose confidential material that it says it took from the county’s computer system.

What Happened?

The detection of a cyber issue on October 19 was confirmed by county officials. In order to assist contain it, the county enlisted outside cybersecurity specialists, and according to officials, this stopped any files from being encrypted.

Although Dallas County claimed that its computer systems were safe to use, the county made no mention of any data that might have been taken during the cyberattack in its online update.

The CBS News Texas I-Team was informed by cybersecurity sources that hackers gained access to the Dallas County computer system most likely via a phishing email, from which they then collected data.

The county’s computer system can continue to function normally because this ransomware assault did not encrypt any data, in contrast to ransomware attacks that do. To extract money, though, one can threaten to publish any possibly stolen material.

Government Institutions Are On Targets

Dallas County

(Photo: thinkcivics)

Play, a hacking collective, has taken credit for the attack. The gang has been connected to hundreds of cyberattacks since June 2022. The organization has been focusing on government buildings most recently.

Government institutions have grown to be a popular target for hackers, according to cybersecurity expert Scott Schober, because they frequently pay and their computers hold vast amounts of sensitive personal data.

Nearly one in three ransomware assaults, according to Schober, are paid for by government agencies. However, those that pay in the hopes of eliminating the danger may end up trapped in a never-ending loop.

Schober clarified, “When you pay, you go onto another list that you are an easy target.” “‘Hey, this agency or this group paid the ransom so let’s go after them again but with a different strain of ransomware this time that can be more crippling.'”

Hackers took thousands of files in April and used ransomware to take down the City of Dallas system for weeks. Hackers also targeted the Dallas Central Appraisal District in November of last year. Additionally, 800,000 pupils’ personal information was stolen by a cybersecurity attack in Dallas ISD last year.

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